Metro

COVID vaccine data skewed by Delta, end of social distancing

[ad_1]

Drops in the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines over the summer were likely the result of the dominant Delta variant and loosening social distancing efforts, a New York health department study suggests.

Factors like fewer people wearing masks were likely to blame and not “waning immunity,” said the Department of Health study, released Monday.

“This latest study conducted by our renowned scientists here at DOH is the largest to examine in-depth changes in vaccine effectiveness over time broken down by all three COVID-19 Drops in the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines over the summer were likely the result of the dominant Delta variant and loosening social distancing efforts.vaccines types currently authorized for use in the United States,” Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement.

“It clearly demonstrates what we’ve been saying all along – getting a COVID-19 vaccine continues to be the best way out of this pandemic, and the best way for New Yorkers to prevent serious illness and hospitalization. We urge all New Yorkers to remain vigilant and get vaccinated against COVID-19 if you have not already done so.”

The statewide study compared unvaccinated people with others who got jabbed with either the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna or Johnson and Johnson vaccines from January to April. It analyzed new COVID cases and pandemic-related hospitalizations from May through August of this year.

Factors like fewer people wearing masks were likely to blame.
REUTERS/Mike Segar/File Photo

The study, which has not been certified by peer review, included 8.8 million New Yorkers and broke down data by age group, type of vaccine and when people were inoculated. Over the time of the study, there were more than 155,000 new cases and over 14,000 hospitalizations across New York, the study said.

It found that the vaccines were 86 percent effective for people 18-64 years old.

Pfizer’s vaccine effectiveness against hospitalizations for people 65 and up dropped from May to August from 95 percent to 89.2 percent, according to the study. Moderna dropped from 97.2 percent to 94.1 percent over the same span. J&J dropped from 85.5 percent to 82.8 percent, according to the data.

A fashionist holds up her vaccination card as she tries to attend a New York Fashion Week's event at Spring Studios in New York on September 8, 2021.
EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP via Getty Images

The study concludes there are “modest declines” limited to Pfizer and Moderna of people older than 65, which it says indicated support for booster shots.

Researchers saw “limited evidence of a decline in effectiveness against severe disease” for people between 18 and 64, lead study author Eli Rosenberg said in a statement.

“While we did observe early declines in effectiveness against infections for this age group, this appears to have leveled off when the Delta variant became the predominant strain in New York,” he said. “Together, this suggests that ongoing waning protection may be less of a current concern for adults younger than 65 years.”

New York State Department of Health Commissioner Howard Zucker
New York State Department of Health Commissioner Howard Zucker made a statement about the study, which has not been certified by peer review.
REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

The drop in efficiency for Pfizer’s vaccine for newly reported infections was 24.6 percent for people between 18 and 49 years old, the study said. It was -19.1 percent for the 50-64 age group and -14.1 for 65 and up, the study said.

Moderna users of the same age group over the same period saw declines of up to 18 percent for 18 to 49-year-olds, -11.6 percent for 50 to 64-year-olds and 9 percent for those 65 and up.

The Janssen vaccines saw – 19.2 percent in the 19-49 age group, -10.8 percent for those 50-64 and -10.9 percent for those 65 and older, according to the data.

[ad_2]

About the author

mm

Kathy Lewis

Kathy Lewis is an all-around geek who loves learning new stuff every day. With a background in computer science and a passion for writing, she loves writing for almost all the sections of Editorials99.

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment